Dr. Smit on Bleb Revision

Posted by H&K on March 29, 2010

Spokane Eye Clinic physician Dr. Barbara Smit recently co-authored an article in Glaucoma Today about bleb revision with two other physicians, Dr. Karen Joos of Vanderbilt Eye Institute in Nashville and Dr. Jonathan Myers of Wills Eye Institute in Philadelphia.

Spokane Eye Clinic physician Dr. Barbara Smit recently co-authored an article in Glaucoma Today about bleb revision with two other physicians, Dr. Karen Joos of Vanderbilt Eye Institute in Nashville and Dr. Jonathan Myers of Wills Eye Institute in Philadelphia.

A bleb is a small fluid filled bubble or blister used in the treatment of glaucoma. Usually located underneath the upper eyelid, a bleb is not painful and usually unnoticeable without lifting the eye lid. When a patient undergoes certain types of glaucoma surgery such as a Trabeculectomy, an alternate drain in the eye is created to increase drainage of aqueous (fluid produced in the eye) to reduce eye pressure. The fluid collects under the conjunctiva ( the transparent this tissue that covers the eye) and creates a bleb.

The Glaucoma Today article discusses when and how the physicians decide to do a bleb revision if a bleb is failing.

To read the full article, click here.

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